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Mother Sues Hospital For Failing To Diagnose Son's Sepsis


Posted on Feb 04, 2010

Brent Adams and Associates filed a medical malpractice lawsuit  against Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital in Dunn N. C. on behalf of an  Erwin woman  who has alleged her son died of sepsis on New Year’s Day 2008 as a result of negligence on the part of the hospital and the emergency room staff.

Emily McBryde son, DeAngelo Barnes was taken to Betsy Johnson Regional Hospital and was seen in the emergency room.  His symptoms were rapid respiratory rate, rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath and lethargy.  His neck was hurting and one hour after admission he developed a reddened area on his chest which eventually into splotches over much of his body.

The child died at 5:58 a.m.  An autopsy later indicated that the child died from sepsis.

Sepsis (commonly known at blood poisoning) is a serious, but common infection which can lead to death if not treated timely and properly.

The lawsuit alleges that the doctor in the emergency room was negligent because he allegedly failed to diagnose sepsis in the child and did not treat the child with appropriate antibiotics.  The suit alleges that the child had all of the classic signs of sepsis and that if the doctor had diagnoses DeAngelo carefully, he would have found sepsis.

The symptoms of sepsis include fever, elevated breathing rate, vomiting.

Sepsis is a common condition seen frequently in hospitals and is the second leading cause of death in non-coronary patients.  It is the tenth most common disease overall.  It occurs in one to two percent of all hospitalizations.

Mrs. McBryde alleged in her suit that her son could have survived if his sepsis had been treated in time by the emergency room personnel at Betsy Johnson Regional Hos

A copy of the complaint can be read and downloaded on this website.

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