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Mississippi Workers Rally To Increase 60 Year OLd Ceiling on Workers' Compensation Benefits


Posted on Feb 24, 2008

On Monday, February 18,  gathers held a rally at the state capitol of Mississippi on behalf of all the workers in the state, in hopes of changes in the worker’s compensation policy of the state.

The members of the Mississippi Workers Center for Human Rights are hoping to see better benefits for employees who have personal injuries occur while on the job. They are calling for the lawmakers in the state to increase the comp days for workers who suffer personal injuries from 450 to 500.

According to supporters of the worker’s comp legislation, the money that injured workers are provided are not enough to cover the medical costs they incur, in addition to the other bills that pile up while they are injured and unable to perform their jobs.

According to Jaribu Hill, president of the Center for Human Rights, there have not been any changes in the worker’s compensation system of the state since the year 1948. That means a total of 60 years since the last time the law was changed or received an “overhaul,” which is why Hill says they want to see changes. Hill says that they want the people of the community to be more aware of what is happening with the workers of the state.

In 2006, more than 12,000 workers in Mississippi were injured while on the job. The state is one of only 17 that have a ceiling on the amount of benefits that an injured worker can receive from worker’s compensation.

North Carolina law provides  one of the better workers' compensation  befefits. In North Carolina there is no limit to the number of weeks a totally disabled worker will collect workers compensation benefits. The amount of weekly payments is linited to two-thirds of the workers pre-injury average weekly wage.

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