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Misdiagnosed Alzheimer’s Could Be Brain Disease CTE


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12/5/2012
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Seniors who have Alzheimer’s may have been misdiagnosed; a brain disease that stems from repeated head trauma develops over time and mimics the same symptoms. The brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) shows symptoms over time.

Most of the CTE cases being discovered are military personnel and athletes. Repetitive head trauma induces a degeneration that releases abnormal proteins into the blood system. Clinics report the symptoms of CTE are similar to that of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. What are CTE symptoms?

  • Cognitive problems that can lead to dementia
  • Aggression
  • Depression with suicidal tendencies

Since repeated head trauma causes CTE, victims of singular accidents or injuries may think they are not capable of developing the brain disease, however it is possible. As an example, a military officer or factory worker could experience the force of an explosion that will actually cause an initial blast, which is followed by blast wind – these multiple forces are enough to cause TCE.

The medical guidelines for establishing a clinical diagnosis of CTE are being developed. Once in place, physicians will have a higher obligation for correctly diagnosing Alzheimer’s and CTE. The risk of medical malpractice with a misdiagnosis could result in unnecessary and inappropriate treatments, and other conditions or illnesses may develop as a result of the misdiagnosis. North Carolina medical malpractice attorneys at Brent Adams & Associates help patients who receive inadequate care. Read more about North Carolina medical malpractice claims and what to do if you experienced a misdiagnosis here.



Category: Medical Malpractice


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